Woodfire Roasted Currimao Tupig

Lanit ti Tupig

Ilocos is also known for that roasted sticky rice cake called tupig, wrapped in I-need-someone-to-unwrap-it-for-me banana leaves. My favorite tupig are the ones with black lenga (sesame seeds) like this one, or the buttery kind like the ones from Irene’s in Currimao in this post. But there’s also this other tupig that has won a provincewide cook-off last year. I’ve tried it and excited to share it with you soon.

The Tupig Maker

So, the photos will show you how the traditional tupig is made. Irene’s Native Delicacies is so conveniently located along the National Highway in Pias Norte. These ones are definitely special.

Here’s a tupig recipe if you are dying to have one and can’t travel to Ilocos. Maybe you can bake them instead.

Sticky Rice-Coconut=Milk MixtureThe Tupig Makers of Irene'sTupigTupig PugonPicture 063
Photographed by Blauearth © Blauearth™ All Rights Reserved 2009-2015

Sarrat patupat and tupig up close and personal

Apart from Christmas, All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day are the times of the year when we get to have a fling with tempting carb-rich native rice cakes. Besides being the home to the elegant Sta. Monica Church and remaining binakol-weavers in Ilocos Norte, the eastern town of Sarrat is also known for its delish patupat and tupig.

My in-laws (some visiting from Manila) bring the specially ordered kankanen from their suki (favorite maker) in Sarrat to the cemetery for us to enjoy while we catch up on each other. I had around ten of the patupat with that lovely shiny “nakilnet a diket.”

A personal favorite is tupig with toasted black sesame seeds. The Sarrat tupig had those black bits plus rich ladek (coconut paste) enveloped in sticky buttery goodness, just so wonderful!

What’s life without a few guilty pleasures?

Photographed by Blauearth © Blauearth™ All Rights Reserved 2009-2011