Tayamen’s: Street food outside of the streets

Street food can be found all over the world. New York wouldn’t be New York without hotdog and pretzel stands. Can you imagine the Arab countries without the ubiquitous shawarma stalls? Or  Japan without the curb-side ramen and soba places? What if Hong Kong’s popular Mong Kok area lost all the dimsum and Peking duck food-booths? And what if esoteric isaw, quec-quec, betamax, helmet, tokneneng and adidas could no longer be found in the streets of Manila? Most definitely, a  bland world for someone who wants to have a taste of  the culture of a particular country or region he, or she, gets to visit.

There are fish ball vendors roaming the streets of  Laoag — the capital city of the northernmost province in the Philippines. But there is also Tayamen’s, which started as a makeshift  food stand in front of the owners’ home. In 1997, the owners receptively opened their home to  their regular habitués, who have become accustomed to calling them “tiyong” and “tiyang”, uncle and auntie in the vernacular.

No risky business when it comes to common Filipino street food — that is what Tayamen’s is all about. Freshness and safety is their foremost concern. Plus, its homey feel makes the place a magnet for school kids and young professionals, who want to let loose and enjoy  their food.

Fish Balls, fish nuggets, kikiam, chicken feet, isaw and  barbecue are the bestsellers of Taya, short for Tayamen’s, and a term popularized by their regular patrons. They also make the best take-out Ilocos longaniza which is sold by the kilo.

Isaw (pig intestines)

Fish nuggets and kikiam with sweet dipping sauce and the ever-present suka ken sili (vinegar and chili)

Once in a while, drinking ice-cold soda, especially after having fried food, won’t hurt *burps*

…………………………………..

Tayamen’s Don E. Ruiz St. Laoag Ilocos Norte Philippines

Photos by Blauearth Copyright © Blauearth™ ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
The photos may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without written permission from the owner.

7 thoughts on “Tayamen’s: Street food outside of the streets

  1. You manage to squeeze in time to smell the flowers (and the fishballs), that’s quite a feat.

    An even bigger accomplishment is how you keep trim while enjoying all those food from Fort Ilocandia to Tayamen’s.

    I am sure moms would be interested to know your ‘secrets’.

    🙂

  2. My 3 sons they alway eat fishball and kikiam they love it, the souse perfect mmmmm yummy… See you there in Tayamens

  3. This post just made me want to eat kikiam right this minute. 🙂 I love fishballs and kikiam. It brings happy memories of my college years. Thanks for sharing.:-)

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