The carinderia with no name

Pareks

Location: Don S. Hernando Ave. (near K’s Bakeshop or the buko roll store), Laoag

Specialties: Salpicao, imbaliktad, beef curry, pares

Ambiance: Streetside, nondescript.

Prices: 50-60 PHP for beef viands, 10 PHP for fried rice. Bone marrow is free (if you ask).

Verdict: If you’re tired of budget food like tapsilog, this is the place to go. If you are budgeting for two, like you have less than 100 pesos to spend, go for salpicao but get one more rice. It’s cooked in margarine, but that’s good ‘coz it’s healthier. On the spicy side, it is tasty with lots of garlic. Pares is supposed to be the star, but is getting eclipsed by salpicao and imbaliktad, says Eki, the young owner. 17-year-old Genesis says bone marrow is anti aging (laughs), so he asked for bone marrow (straight from the fridge) and added it to his hot pares and waited a bit for the bone marrow to thaw. Pares tastes like a cross between corned beef and beef stew. Even better with bone marrow. I ditched rice when I started my Javita diet, but cheated to enjoy the food. Definitely going back again.

Carinderia EatingPinoy CondimentsCarinderia
Photographed by Blauearth © Blauearth™ All Rights Reserved 2009-2015

APEC convergence on renewable energy in Ilocos Norte welcomed by protest

Renewable Energy protest in Ilocos Norte - April 13, 2015

On opening day of the APEC-EGNRET new and renewable energy meeting in Ilocos Norte, the rising renewable energy capital in the country, a group of local multi-sectoral representatives show up at Laoag’s Aurora Park to protest the plunder of people’s resources and corporate greed; and to call on government to junk the Electric Power Industry Reform Act (EPIRA), or Republic Act 9136 of 2001, a law aimed to foster competition among power players and bring down electricity prices. But say the protesters, electricity cost in Ilocos Norte remains higher than the average in the country.

Renewable Energy Protest Rally in Ilocos Norte - April 13, 2015

Having opened its doors to non-local renewable energy investors, Ilocos Norte, as host to more private renewable energy corporations, has changed its landscape almost overnight, with the addition of even taller windmills, losing pristine areas and tens of thousands of trees, and is exposed to lose more while projects are underway.

A visitor in the North was overheard to have said, “The northern coastal district is turning into the Divisoria of windmills.”

Northern Luzon UPC Asia Corporation (NLUPC)The Northern Luzon UPC-Asia (NLUPC Asia) Corporation wind turbines in Pagudpud, shot a few months back.

Other demonstrators who joined in are indigenous peoples from far-flung barangays. According to Yapayao tribal chieftain Benny Aquinaldo of Caunayan, Pagudpud, part of the Northern Luzon UPC-Asia (NLUPC Asia) Corp. wind energy project stands on their ancestral domain. He adds, his tribe has not received compensation, except for 10 cows, 11 goats, one goose, one generator, one manual deep well pump and not one single livelihood. The renewable energy company has not implemented the memoradum of agreement (MOA) signed by the Yapayaos and NLUPC Asia, through the process of Free and Prior Informed Consent (FPIC) before the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) Provincial Office, headed by Atty. Jesus G. Agbayani, reiterates tribal elder Marcos Domingo.

Renewable Energy Protest Rally in Ilocos Norte - April 13, 2015Renewable Energy protest in Ilocos Norte - April 13, 2015Police Vehicle carrying shieldsPolice officers ready their shields.

Photographed by Blauearth © Blauearth™ All Rights Reserved 2009-2015

Laoag City in One Day

The Fort Ilocandia Courtyard and Fountain

The Part 2 of Melanie, Raine and Ali’s Ilocos tour with me takes place in my hometown of Laoag. Like I wrote in Loving Laoag, the cover story of Mabuhay Magazine February 2015 issue, Laoag translates to radiance in the vernacular, hence the sobriquet “Sunshine City.” For not wearing a hat, I got mild sunstroke and had to beg off from another guiding trip for a friend and her friends today. Reminding everyone to drink lots of water and maybe overdose on citrus fruits and put on tons of sunblock and wear protective gear when in Ilocos, especially if you are heading out to the famed Laoag “La Paz” Sand Dunes. Btw, my group the LEAD Movement started the sandboarding adventure in Ilocos, so anybody interested can just contact me, even through the blog. I will answer all your queries.

The Fort Ilocandia’s courtyard with a fountain still looks so much the same. It is so perfect for an evening event. But because the Laoag Parklane Hotel is so very near my house, the girls made Parklane their home in Laoag, and my humble dining table theirs too.

IlocosRort IlocandiaFort IlocandiaFort IlocandiaLaoag "La Paz" sandboardingOffroading in La Paz, LaoagLaoag Sand AdventureHorse MobileRed DotYou know how girls are.Laoag Sinking Bell TowerLaoag Parklane Hotel

Photographed by Blauearth © Blauearth™ All Rights Reserved 2009-2015

Passing on the value of social and moral responsibility to DWCL graduating students

DWCL Students Forum on Mining

Words and photos by Donna Rabang Peta

Graduating students of Divine Word College of Laoag (DWCL) gathered at the St. Freinademetz Theater on March 16, 2015 for the “Students Forum on Mining” to commemorate the 20 years of the Philippine Mining Act 1995, enacted during the presidency of Fidel Valdez Ramos.

Born and raised in a mining community area in Ucab, Itogon, Benguet, and a former small-scale miner, Mr. Fernando “Ampy” Mangili, now a member convenor of AMIANAN SALAKNIBAN, or the Northern Luzon Mine Watch and Human Rights Network, served as guest speaker.

Manong Ampy and his katribu in Itogon, Benguet have been fighting for more than 100 years to protect their environment. In his testimony, Manong Ampy said, “Ang ganda ng Ilocos Norte ikumpara nyo sa lugar namin na may mining. Ang pangit ng lugar namin, nasira ang aming mga bundok, walang nang tubig at kahit nga ang munisipyo namin ay ang pangit kung saan ay dito nagmina ng mahigit 100 years.”

Manong Ampy added, “In three years alone, masisira na ang kalikasan dahil highly mechanized na ang sistema at operasyon ng pagmimina. Wala pang kahit anong mining company, from Mindanao to Aparri, who rehabilitated the river system at mga bundok na nasira nila. One question to these mining companies is their identity claiming that they are responsible and friendly, and yet they never returned back to the communities na sinira nila.”

At the end of his speech, he encouraged the students of DWCL to support their advocacy, struggle to protect the environment and to defend the future.

The challenge of Manong Ampy was concurred by Ms. Romana L. Bitancor, Vice President for Academic Affairs of DWCL.  She said, “Kayo dapat ang manguna na may concern sa environment dahil you are going out after you graduate. Professional kayon ton… you have the credibility to talk about it. You should treasure what you should have learned in this gathering and tell the world when you go outside the school. Being concerned of the environment is a social responsibility”

© Blauearth™ All Rights Reserved 2009-2015